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Messerschmitt Bf 109

// Information about the famous German fighter Messerschmitt Bf 109.

Build 9.92 m
Length 8.85 m
Height 2.59 m
Weight 1964 kg (empty) 

2746 kg (full)
Engine Daimler Benz and DF601
Maximum speed 628 Km / h
Altitude Achieved 11,600 m
Range 700 Km
Armament MG 151, two guns 15 mm (under the motor) 

2 MG FF cannons of 20 mm (wings)

The first tests were carried out in March 1936 as a prototype and entered on service in August 1938. It was one of the protagonists of the Spanish Civil War in which participated with the Condor Legion. The first versions were the Bf 109B, C and D, each with less power than the final version: the 109E. This version went to war in the last days of August 1939, coinciding with the start of the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany (Blitzkrieg). Between 1939 and 1941 it was one of the most important fighters of the Luftwaffe. 

During the early years of World War II and during the Battle of Britain, the 109E or Emil (as the version E was known) destroyed most of the aircraft with which they fought. However, there was one exception, the British Spitfire which completely surpassed the number of German units manufactured.

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November 13, 2013 at 07:30:05 PM
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Messerschmitt Bf 109 was one of the best fighters from the WWII, and was in service a long period after the war ended, in some countries. Here is a link modellers may find useful, with some free blueprints for this awesome fighter - Messerschmitt Bf 109 plans & drawings
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